R J Comeau - Curriculum Design & Research

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Story

Strengths

Goals

Express

Self-talk

Problem solving

Habits

Decolonize the mind

 

Below, you'll find excerpts from Know Thyself on helping students express their thoughts and feelings, helping them to reduce stress and cognitive load in the near term, and helping teachers better understand their individual students

 

Section 4) Express your thoughts and feelings (and shape them to work for your goals)

Here’s a chance to get what’s in your head and your heart out on paper in a free-write.

There are tools in this section to shape your thoughts and feelings so that they serve your pursuit of your goals, instead of getting in the way.

Research has shown that  increasing your awareness of your own thoughts and feelings, and intervening in thinking and emotions that are leading to behaviors that you want to change, can help you make positive steps toward personal goals (Meichenbaum, 1977). Other research has shown that expressive writing can help those who have suffered traumatic experiences, leading to better health outcomes and emotional well-being (Pennebaker & Chung, 2007).

For today, select one of the prompts below, and write a page or two in response. In coming days, choose a different prompt, or reflect back on an earlier day’s writing, and do metacognition: thinking about your own thinking and feelings, analyzing patterns and looking deeply into root causes.

Eventually, you’ll move on to the sections that help you to shape the thoughts and feelings you’re having that are interfering with your success in school. We’ll have conversations about your writing, thoughts, and feelings. Over time, let’s work to build a positive mindset and a resilient attitude, to help you do better in school.

 

Prompts: Write about …

  1. the thoughts and feelings you have about school.
  2. the thoughts and feelings you have about something that’s troubling you.
  3. the thoughts and feelings you have about trauma, conflict, or stress that you’ve suffered.
  4. the thoughts and feelings you have about the historical and current situation of your place in society, in terms of race, class, native language, and/or gender.
  5. the thoughts and feelings you have at the moment, whatever they are.

 

Alternatively, you can choose to write poetry, lyrics, hip hop – all of which can be therapeutic, and empowering.

 

 

Early in the process, it’s best to just write, to get your thoughts and feelings onto the page. As we talk together about your writing, we’ll look for opportunities to reshape or reframe any thoughts and feelings that trouble you, detailed in the pages that follow.

 

Next Step: Move from expressing yourself to self-analysis for personal and social change. See

Beliefs, p. 53

Problems, p. 62

Habits, p. 132

Liberation, p. 146

 

 

References

Meichenbaum, D. (1977). Cognitive-behavior modification: An integrative approach. Springer.

 

Pennebaker, J. W., & Chung, C. K. (2007). Expressive writing, emotional upheavals, and health. Foundations of health psychology, 263-284.

 

Story

Strengths

Goals

Express

Self-talk

Problem solving

Habits

Decolonize the mind

HomeKnow ThyselfAnalysisExperientialCritical ConSeminarHS ReadingELA 12Contact

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