R J Comeau - Curriculum Design & Research

HomeKnow ThyselfAnalysisExperientialCritical ConSeminarHypertextsELA 12Contact

Story

Strengths

Goals

Express

Self-talk

Problem solving

Habits

Decolonize the mind

 

Below, you'll find excerpts from Know Thyself on helping students write about their goals in class, school, career, and life. Keeping their own goals in mind helps students do better in school, and helps teachers connect students' motivation with academic work and personal encouragement.

 

 

Section 3: Define your own goals (and adapt them to fit your reality)

What do you hope to accomplish, in this class, in your senior year, in college, and in life? Analyzing your goals, and adjusting them to the situation on the ground, can clarify a path forward, and motivate change.

 

Research into skilled learners has shown that students who set their own near-term goals and monitor their progress toward them do better in school, and feel better about their futures (Zimmerman, 2002).

 

Prompts: Write about Ö

  1. your goals for this class.
  2. your goals for your senior year.
  3. your goals for college admissions.
  4. your goals in your career.
  5. your goals in life.

 

Early in the process, itís best to just write, to get your ideas about goals started on the page. As we talk together about your plans, youíll set near-term goals that will move you in the direction youíve chosen, and youíll keep a record of  your progress.

 Next Step: Move from expressing your goals to making them happen. Make your dreams real by planning out steps to take today. See pg. 38.

Setting near-term goals

 

Long-term goal:

 

Near term goal that will move you toward it:

 

Record your progress toward that near-term goal, reflecting on evidence from your experiments with effective strategies:

 

Do you need to adjust your near-term goal or long-term goal, or your strategy for meeting it? If so, how? If not, why?

 

What messages are you telling yourself about your progress, or failure, to meet your goal?

 

Do you need to adjust your self-talk about your progress, or failure, to meet you goal? If so, how? If not, why not?


References

Zimmerman, B. J. (2002). Becoming a self-regulated learner: An overview. Theory into practice, 41(2), 64-70.

 

Story

Strengths

Goals

Express

Self-talk

Problem solving

Habits

Decolonize the mind

HomeKnow ThyselfAnalysisExperientialCritical ConSeminarHS ReadingELA 12Contact

Copyright 2013-2015 Robert J. Comeau